Golf Putters Info History Brands

Top of the Line Golf Putters via mygolf.blog

By Justin Johnson at GolfWeek.com

High-quality putters are intricately manufactured and tested clubs.

High-quality putters are intricately manufactured and tested clubs.

The putter is the smallest club in a set of golf clubs, yet is the club with which the most strokes are taken.

The art of designing and manufacturing putters has been mastered by a number of companies that produce high-quality, top-of-the-line putters. A high-quality putter is usually made of finely milled metals and usually is either aesthetically pleasing or has a eccentric, yet functional design.

Overview

High-quality putters are intricately manufactured and tested clubs.

High-quality putters are intricately manufactured and tested clubs.

The putter is the smallest club in a set of golf clubs, yet is the club with which the most strokes are taken.

The art of designing and manufacturing putters has been mastered by a number of companies that produce high-quality, top-of-the-line putters. A high-quality putter is usually made of finely milled metals and usually is either aesthetically pleasing or has a eccentric, yet functional design.

Scotty Cameron Putters

Scotty Cameron founded Cameron Golf International with his wife in 1992.

Prior to starting Cameron Golf International, Scotty Cameron worked for other golf companies’ design teams, including Ray Cook Putters, Maxfli Golf and Mizuno Golf.

Cameron joined his company with the Acushnet Co.–which manufactures the Titleist and FootJoy brands–in 1994, a relationship still in existence as of August 2010.

Scotty Cameron’s putters are played by a majority of PGA Tour players and top amateur golfers and are also highly sought after by putter collectors. Cameron has a state-of-the-art putter studio in Carlsbad, California, where most of his designing and putter manufacturing is completed.

Bettinardi Putters

Bettinardi putters are manufactured by Bettinardi Golf Ltd. Bob Bettinardi is the founder of Bettinardi Golf. Prior to designing and manufacturing putters, he was an engineer of products for the defense and medical equipment industries. Bettinardi putters have been used on the PGA Tour by the likes of great golfers such as Jesper Parnevik and Jim Furyk. Bettinardi uses a honeycomb-shaped milling process to mill the faces of his putters, producing a putter face design like no other putter on the market as of 2010. In addition to milling high-quality putters, Bettinardi also mills high-fashion belt buckles that are favored among golf equipment enthusiasts.

Odyssey Golf Putters

Odyssey Golf began producing high-quality putters in 1991 when it produced a one piece putter head made of a revolutionary polymer called Stronomic. The putter quickly gained acceptance on the PGA Tour. However, the release of the White Hot 2-Ball Putter in 2001 catapulted Odyssey Golf into the position of the No. 1 putter in golf.

The White Hot 2-Ball Putter is the highest-selling putter by units sold in history. The putter features two white discs on top of the mallet-shaped head to assist golfers in lining up putts more accurately.

Odyssey has a wide range of putters that are widely used on all major professional tours. The company was purchased by Callaway Golf in 1997.Farmers Insurance Open fantasy golf power rankingsTorrey Pines Golf Course is setting up to host its first of two tournaments this year (Farmers Insurance Open & U.S. Open). Here are the fantasy golf power rankings and betting odds for the top 10 golfers at the 2021 Farmers Insurance Open.Volume 0%

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Ping Putters History

By Alan Donahue

Golfing is not just about skills, it is about using the best equipment.

This is why hundreds of golfers have relied on Ping Golf Co.’s line of clubs that all started with a putter over 50 years ago.

Their innovative clubs have become an integral part of golf and are associated with some of the biggest wins in PGA golf history. Their long history shows why the club is successful and how it has developed throughout the years.

1950s to 1960s

Working out of his own garage, Karsten Solheim developed the first Ping putter in his own garage in 1959. That model was labeled the 1-A putter and featured weight that kept balance throughout the head of the club.

The success of the putter was proven three years later when the Cajun Classic golf tournament was won by John Barnum as he used the putter. The Karsten Manufacturing Corp. was developing to further produce the landmark clubs.

1970s

The 1970s saw the putters expand and the Anser line even developed drivers and iron clubs.

A new tradition started with each winning putter becoming duplicated, labeled and sealed in a vault. The label was created using gold plaque material that can still be seen today at their headquarters. The success of the putters grew and the majority of putters used in the PGA and tournaments were Ping putters by the end of the 1970s.

1980s

The 1987 PGA Championship helped put the new Anser2 putter on the map. Along with that putter, the PAL, PAL2 and ZING 2 were released during the 1980s. The putters’ acclaim earned Karsten national recognition from Ronald Reagan. Reagan awarded him with the “E” award for his exportation of Ping putters because they have always been American made.

1990s

The 1990s brought on some of the same success and new changes for the company. Karsten received tournaments dedicated in his name and the Ping putters were responsible for five tournament wins in a row in 1993. Business in the 1990s continued to thrive for Ping putters, and Kirsten’s son eventually took over the company as the putters were used to win over 1,400 golf tournaments, including over 40 major tournaments.

2000s

Kirsten passed away in the early 2000s, but his legacy continued within the company he created.

The World Golf Hall of Fame inducted him, and the Ping Craz-E putter saw huge success with its release in 2004. The putter quickly spread as one of the best and broke records as it was used to win over 2,200 tournaments.

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The History of Ping Putters

By Lyle Smith

In 1959, a man working in his California garage changed the face of the golf industry. Karsten Solheim, then an engineer with GE, designed and built a putter based on a new idea–heel-toe weighting. The popularity of this putter led to a new company called Ping Golf and allowed Solheim to develop several other revolutionary ideas in golf design that have become nearly universal in the industry today.

Designer

Karsten Solheim was an inveterate tinkerer. He started building putters in his garage and continued to work in his spare time throughout 1959 until he came up with what he called the 1-A, an offset, heel-to-toe weighted putter that offered unusual consistency of stroke and roll of the ball.

Manufacturer

After the putter was declared as conforming to golf rules by the USGA, it was introduced to tournament golf by a few players on the PGA Tour. The 1-A generated terrific interest among PGA professionals, and through them the public. Ping’s first victory on tour came in the 1962 Cajun Classic Open–won by John Barnum–and the company never looked back.

Throughout the 1960s and into the 1970s the putter’s popularity continued to grow and Ping developed new cast iron clubs that implemented the same type of weight-shifting design, now called “perimeter weighting.” The company has grown into one of the largest golf manufacturers in the world and produces everything from putters, irons and drivers to clothing, bags and accessories.

Design

Solheim’s putter design removed much of the mass–or weight–of the putter head from the back of the center of the club and moved it to the heel and toe of the club.

He designed an offset neck attached toward the heel of the putter, all of which expanded the sweet spot and all but eliminated mis-hit puts.

It also introduced a ringing sound when the ball was struck.

That sound–the “Ping”–became the name of the company. Solheim’s design principles have been adapted by golf club designers in every corner of the industry.

Success

Ping players have won events at every level of the sport from junior and club events to amateur championships and all four modern major championships. Perhaps the most well-known player to use a Ping putter in his prime was Tom Watson, who won all eight of his major championships with the club in his bag.

Impact

Ping putters remain popular at every course in the country, but most telling is how many other manufacturers have utilized the heel-toe weighting, offset hosel and hollow-back design principles introduced by Solheim and Ping. Just about every manufacturer today utilizes some version of these principles within their putter lines.

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The History of Bulls Eye Putters

By Lyle Smith

Technology is a consistent buzz word in the golf equipment industry and has been for generations.

But just a brief look at the history of golf and golf clubs reveals several clubs that have made an undeniable impact on the game through unique design, materials, popularity or tournament success. The famous Bulls Eye putter has made a mark on all four of these points.

Designer

Originally introduced in the mid-1940s by John Reuter Jr., Inc., the Bulls Eye putter became wildly popular among recreational and tournament players alike.

The original club was a simple design with a brass head that could putt the ball left or right-handed. Later designs added a flange along the back for stability.

Manufacturer

The Reuter company was purchased by the Acushnet corporation, maker of Titleist golf balls, in 1962.

Acushnet, founded in 1910, was originally a producer of rubber products and started making golf balls in the 1920s.

Its golf business proved so popular that it expanded into club-making and today is one of the largest golf manufacturers in the world, owning Titleist, Foot Joy and several other brands. The Bulls Eye putter remained a popular club into the 1980s, when putter design in the industry started to take a more technological direction.

Design

The Bulls Eye featured an unusual–for its time–center-shafted design.

Made of polished or brushed brass, the putter distributed its weight both along the blade in front of the shaft but also in a smaller piece extending behind the shaft. The design meant the weight would more easily balance off-center hits. The club was offered in both a straight and flanged model. The softer brass clubhead offered players a new feel in their putting game.

Success

Many tournament players used versions of the Bulls Eye putter throughout their careers and many tournaments were won with the popular club. Amateur championships, professional tour events and even major championships are among the successes notched by the Bulls Eye, perhaps most notably Johnny Miller’s record 63 in the final round of the 1973 U.S. Open at Oakmont in Pennsylvania.

Impact

While putter design has taken marked detours from the design principles forged by John Reuter and the Bulls Eye putter, some of the major ideas remain in place. Weight distribution, minimizing the impact of off-center hits and simply rolling the ball end over end into the hole are still the most important aspects of putter design. Titleist designer Scotty Cameron has even taken a pass at a new version of the Bulls Eye in recent years, implementing a milled face on a carbon-steel clubhead in the classic center-shafted shape.

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Ping Golf Clubs History

By Denise Sullivan

Ping started off in 1959 as a one-man operation making putters in a garage.

Today, it is one of the most recognized names in golf equipment, with a product line that includes clubs, clothing, gloves and bags. Ping innovations like perimeter weighting, heat-treated clubheads and color coding of lie and loft are now considered the standard and used by manufacturers throughout the golf industry.

The Beginning

In 1959, a General Electric engineer named Karsten Solheim was dissatisfied with the putters available on the market.

He designed a new one in his garage, calling it the “Ping 1A” because of the sound the metal blade made when it contacted the ball. The Ping putter’s head was weighted at the heel and toe, which created a larger sweet spot in the middle of the clubface.

Founding the Company

Demand for Solheim’s new design increased during the early part of the 1960s, spurred on in part by John Barnum winning the 1962 Cajun Classic with a Ping putter and a subsequent “Sports Illustrated” article. In 1966, Solheim developed the Anser putter, which has been used in more than 500 PGA Tour victories. Solheim quit his job at General Electric in 1967 to create the Karsten Manufacturing Corporation in Phoenix, Arizona.

Ping Irons

Solheim expanded his product line in 1969, adding a set of irons that used the patented Ping heel-toe weighting. Solheim’s irons were also custom-fitted to each golfer, which was unusual at the time.

The loft and position of the clubhead could be modified according to the golfer’s specifications during the heat-treating process. Once the proper fit was achieved, the club was color coded so the customer could easily order a replacement.

Trouble in the 1980s

Karsten Manufacturing was involved in legal battles with the U.S. Golf Association and the PGA Tour throughout the 1980s. The controversy started in 1984, when the USGA changed its rules to allow irons with U-shaped grooves. Ping rounded off the edges of its U-shaped grooves to protect the ball from damage, which the USGA claimed was a violation of its new guidelines. Solheim disputed this ruling and eventually sued both the USGA and the tour.

The lawsuit with the USGA was settled in 1990, followed by a settlement with the PGA Tour in 1993. The courts decided that Ping’s older irons were acceptable, but any new designs would have to be altered to conform with the USGA’s requirements.

The Comeback

Karsten’s son John took over as the company’s president in 1995 and reorganized player sponsorship deals and marketing plan. Instead of offering bonuses to professionals who won tournaments using Ping equipment, the company signed several players to contracts that paid a full salary regardless of performance.

The company’s print ads were updated to reach a younger market, and television commercials were introduced. The product line was also expanded with a new series of oversize metal woods, which were becoming popular with recreational golfers.

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The Evolution of Putters

By M.L. Rose

Technological advances have changed all golf clubs over the years, including putters. With putters, however, the changes have come almost exclusively within the club head.

Since golfers will never need to generate maximum club head speed for a putt, golf shaft innovations have minimal impact on putting success. But focusing on the club head still leaves plenty of room for tinkering, as evidenced by the variety of shapes and sizes you’ll find among 21st century putter club heads.

Early Putters

In golf’s early days all clubs were made from wood, and putters were no exception.

The original putters — known as “putting cleeks” — had heads made from woods such as beech, holly, pear and apple, while ash or hazel were typically used for the shafts. With the advent of the more durable gutta-percha balls in the mid-19th century, iron heads became more popular among putters, according to ThinkQuest.org.

Putter Shafts

Steel golf shafts were used in the late 19th century and were officially legalized by the Royal & Ancient Golf Club in Scotland after the Prince of Wales used them at St. Andrews in 1929, according to the Golf Europe website. Steel shafts soon became the standard in putters, and they remain so in the 21st century. With the advent of the iron and wood numbering system in the 1930s, the term “cleek” was dropped in favor of the simpler “putter.”

Center-Shafted Putters

For most of golf’s history, putter shafts were attached to club heads at about the same point at which shafts were attached to wood and iron heads – at the club head’s heel, or, in the case of some putters, very close to the heel.

But the center-shafted putter — with the shaft attached approximately midway between the heel and toe — was legalized by the R&A, the governing body of golf worldwide, in 1951. A variety of bent and offset shafts have since been manufactured.

Cavity-Back Putters

Karsten Solheim began what became the PING company by manufacturing an innovative putter that focused the club head weight at the heel and toe. The distinctive “ping” sound the club head created when striking a ball gave his company its name. Solheim followed up his initial design with the Anser, the first cavity-back putter, which was designed to be forgiving of mishits.

Modern Putters

Modern putters run the gamut from conventional blades to mallet heads to wild-looking club heads that feature a variety of attachments behind the club face.

The attachments are generally designed to prevent the club head from twisting if the golfer doesn’t stroke the ball in the center of the club face. Mallets are designed to work the same way.

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The History of Golf Putters

By Brian Hill

Golfers throughout history have had a love/hate relationship with their putters. They love the putter when they sink a monster 50-foot putt, but they view it in a less favorable light when they miss a simple-looking 3-footer for par. Golfers are forever experimenting with different putters to find the one that feels absolutely perfect and gives them more confidence on the greens.

Earliest Putters

Golfers in the 16th century played with wooden-headed clubs.

The putter was referred to as a “putting cleek” and would have been fashioned out of a hard wood such as beech. The putter shaft was made of ash or hazel wood. In 1618, the featherie golf ball was introduced. This ball was made of a leather cover stuffed with goose feathers. The featherie was not a durable ball, so players continued to prefer wooden-headed clubs–including putters–even though iron heads were available.

A New Ball Affects Club Design

In 1848, the gutta percha golf ball–called the “guttie”–was introduced. This ball was made of rubbery sap from a tree grown in tropical regions. It was significantly more durable and less expensive to manufacture than the easily damaged featherie, so golfers began using iron-headed clubs more and more, which greatly improved accuracy on most shots and improved feel on the putting greens. A typical putter from the late 1800s was one made by St. Andrews, Scotland, club maker Willie Wilson.

By this time hickory wood from the United States was the most popular material for fashioning shafts because of its durability. Wilson’s design consisted of a simple brass club head with a thin blade, and a grip of padded sheepskin.

The Most Renowned Putter of All Time

Legendary golfer Bobby Jones won 13 major championships–including the Grand Slam in his triumphant year of 1930–with a putter so famous that it has a name, Calamity Jane.

Actually there were two Calamity Janes, an original and a replacement made by the Spalding company for Jones after the original became too worn. The putter was relatively short, only 33 ½ inches in length. It was a goose-necked design with 8 degrees of loft on the blade and a hickory shaft.

It is believed the original was made in Scotland around 1900. The second Calamity Jane can be seen at the USGA museum in Far Hills, New Jersey. It is estimated that the putter’s worth is in the low seven figures.

The Ping Putter

In 1959, mechanical engineer Karsten Solheim invented the Ping putter in his garage in Redwood City, California. The putter was named for the slight pinging sound it makes when the ball was struck.

He moved to Phoenix, Arizona, several years later and in 1966 his company produced the Anser putter, which became one of the most popular putter designs in golf history. In the 1980s 26 of the 40 major championships in golf were won by golfers using Ping putters.

New Technology

Just as with metal woods and irons, today’s putters feature the latest technology, which allows golfers to improve their scores.

Moment of inertia (MOI) technology serves to reduce the twisting of the putter blade when it makes off-center contact with the ball. Club designers describe this as making the club more “forgiving.”

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Types of Putter Heads

By J.D. Chi

Putter heads are available in a range of shapes and sizes, and finding the right putter head for your stroke is essential to consistency on the green.

A putter head may be large or small, heavy or light, long or compact and shaped in a variety of ways. Odyssey Golf, Scotty Cameron (Titleist) and Ping are among the most cutting-edge putter-head makers.

Overview

Putter heads are available in a range of shapes and sizes, and finding the right putter head for your stroke is essential to consistency on the green.

A putter head may be large or small, heavy or light, long or compact and shaped in a variety of ways. Odyssey Golf, Scotty Cameron (Titleist) and Ping are among the most cutting-edge putter-head makers.

Blade

Blade-shaped putter heads are the most traditional and recommended for straight putters, according to Golf Putter Guide. Putters with blade heads are among the lightest and smallest, compact and fairly narrow, and the weight is in the face. Nearly every major putter maker, from Scotty Cameron to Odyssey to Ping, has a blade option. The Odyssey White Hot XG blade was the putter PGA Tour star Phil Mickelson used to win the 2010 Masters, according to Golf.com. The cavity-back putter, which has a hollow spot along the center of the back of the blade, is an offshoot of the blade but longer and with a larger sweet spot.

Mallet

The mallet carries most of its weight on the face and includes the heaviest putter heads on the market. A mallet head usually resembles a half-circle and slides across the green, reducing the risk of digging in.

An offshoot of the mallet head is the two-ball putter, which has two circles in a straight line on the top of the head. Most major golf club makers, including Ping, Odyssey and TaylorMade, offer mallets.

Picking the Right Style

When selecting a putter, golfers should take into consideration their overall accuracy. Blades are meant for players with pure, straight strokes and are generally used by touring pros or very low-handicap players. Because blades are smaller, they’re harder to control.

Mallets and cavity-back putters are easier to hit and a better choice for most golfers. The mallet shape allows it to sweep over the green, minimizing mis-hits. In addition, mallets are larger and have bigger sweet spots. Other options to consider for a putter include weight, grip and length (standard, belly or long).

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What Makes Scotty Cameron Putters Great?

By M.L. Rose

Scotty Cameron’s putters have been the choice of many PGA Tour members since the early 1990s. Tiger Woods, Mark O’Meara, Sergio Garcia, Peter Jacobsen, Jason Dufner and Rory McIlroy are among the leading pro golfers who have used Cameron’s creations. You might say, then, that some of the best golfers of the late 20th and early 21st centuries have helped to make Cameron’s putters great. At the same time, Cameron’s putters have played no small role in making quite a few golfers great.

History

Cameron began working on putters, along with his father, at age 6. He built his first new putter at 12, using a machine shop owned by a friend’s father. Shortly thereafter he put a milling machine in his parents’ garage. By age 22 he had professional clients, including O’Meara, who was then playing on a mini-tour.

At 23, Cameron was hired by leading independent club maker Ray Cook and went on to consult for Mizuno and to design and sell his own putters.

Cameron’s big break occurred in 1993 when Bernhard Langer putted with one of his designs to win the Masters. During the 1994 season, 129 golfers used a Cameron putter at least once.

Cameron formed a business partnership with Titleist in late 1994. That relationship was still going strong as of the date of publication.

Custom Fit

Cameron sells a variety of retail putters, but he also produces custom-fit designs. He videotapes his individual clients to help them determine their needs. He sometimes points out a player’s swing flaw, while on other occasions he designs a club to compensate for a player’s individual putting idiosyncrasies.

Soft Edge

Cameron credits years of video research with helping him design putters that feel good in a golfer’s hands. He cites the characteristic soft trailing edge of his putter heads as a reason golfers like his putters, explaining that the feel of the soft edge helps to lessen the tension many players encounter when putting.

Fast Worker

In a 2002 “Sports Illustrated” profile titled “Putter King,” Cameron was quoted saying that if a pro golfer phones him with specifications he wants in a new putter, he can complete the project in 13 hours. His continued popularity on the PGA Tour indicates that his claim is not an idle boast.

Critics

Some rival putting designers accuse Cameron of simply copying designs from classic club makers such as T.P. Mills or PING’s Karsten Solheim. Cameron responds that every designer builds on the work of his predecessors, noting that Mills and Solheim both incorporated some of Cook’s ideas. Cameron acknowledges using some of Mills and Solheim’s techniques, explaining, “My whole idea was to improve on their work.”

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Do Any Pro Golfers Use the SeeMore Putter?

By M.L. Rose

The SeeMore Putter Company manufactures several distinctive lines of putters. Among the standout features of SeeMore putters are the markings on top of the club heads: two parallel white lines and a red dot. When a player takes the address position, he aligns the bottom of the putter’s shaft between the white lines, and makes sure the red dot is covered from view by the shaft.

This, says the company, helps golfers set up square to the target each time. Some professional golfers, including PGA Tour pro Zach Johnson, use SeeMore putters.

Company History

The SeeMore Putting Company was founded by golf instructor Jim Weeks in 1998. At first, the company just sold the putter Weeks invented. As of 2012, it sells several lines of mostly high-end putters. A key part of its marketing strategy, according to “Business Week,” is offering free putters to professional golfers.

Zach Johnson

Through the end of the 2011 season, Zach Johnson had won seven PGA Tour events, including the 2007 Masters. Johnson used a SeeMore putter in his Masters triumph.

After two rounds, he was at even-par 144 and had taken 53 putts, tied for the fewest number in the field.

Johnson shot a 4-over-par 76 in the third round and was at 220, two shots behind leader Stuart Appleby, but finished with a 3-under 69 to win by two strokes.

Johnson had birdies on holes 13, 14 and 16 in the final round. Afterward, Appleby said Johnson had “neutralized us with smart play and good putting.” Early in the 2012 season, Johnson continued to use a SeeMore putter on tour.

Payne Stewart

The late Payne Stewart won the 1999 U.S. Open at Pinehurst by one stroke, using a SeeMore putter; it was his success on the greens that gave him his come-from-behind victory.

Stewart trailed leader Phil Mickelson by one stroke late in the final round when he rolled in a 25-foot birdie putt on the 16th hole to draw even. Stewart took the lead with a 3-foot birdie putt on 17, then clinched the victory with a 15-foot par putt on the final hole. Stewart needed just 24 putts in the final round.

Other Golfers

Among other pro golfers who’ve enjoyed success with SeeMore putters in recent years is D.A. Points, who won the 2011 Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. In 2011, LPGA Tour veteran Michele Redman won the ISPS Legends Tour Open Championship with a SeeMore putter and Russell Knox won the Chiquita Classic on the Nationwide Tour. As of April 2012, Knox was playing on the PGA Tour.

Kyle Reifers, who played with a SeeMore putter, played the PGA Tour in 2007 before becoming a standout on the Nationwide Tour. He returned to the PGA Tour in 2012.

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How to Identify Putters

By M.L. Rose

Putters may be classified in several different ways.

For every expert who says there are X number of different types of putters grouped by one method, there is another who counters that there are Y number of putter types according to a different classification. The particular label that matters most to an individual golfer may depend on the golfer’s putting style or personal taste.

Head Shape

A quick glance at a putter’s head is all you need to distinguish between the two most common shapes: Mallets and blades. The blade is the classic putter shape. Look at a photo of a 20th century golfer holding a putter and you’re almost guaranteed to see a blade. The blade contains a long, slim, roughly rectangular-shaped head. A typical mallet head is semicircular in shape. The head may be mostly solid, or it may feature several pieces of metal, with plenty of space between them, sitting behind the flat club face. In the latter case the metal pieces typically outline a semicircle.

Weight Balance

With respect to weight balance, there are three categories of putters: Toe-balanced, face-balanced and 45-degree-balanced clubs. The club types can be distinguished by balancing the shaft on your hand so the club is horizontal to the ground. If the toe points directly down the club is toe-balanced.

If the club face remains parallel to the ground then the putter is face-balanced. Should the toe point downward at an angle, it’s labeled as a 45-degree-balanced putter, even if the angle isn’t exactly 45 degrees.

Length

The Rules of Golf limit clubs to 48 inches in length — except for putters. While a standard retail putter is about 35 to 36 inches long, a handful of professional players use extra-long putters, even some that push past the 48-inch limit that applies to other clubs.

The most common longer putters are called “Belly Putters” because the golfer rests the end of the grip on his belly as he begins his stroke. Other extra-long putters are termed “broomsticks” or simply “long putters.” Some have two grips on which the player separates his hands, placing one on each grip.

Shaft

Some putters are “heel-shafted,” with the shaft attaching at or very near the club head’s heel.

If the shaft attaches in the middle of the club head, the club is called a “center-shafted” putter.

If the club head is set back, relative to the longest part of the shaft, it’s termed an “offset” putter. Putters with bent shafts may also be classified as “single-bend” or “double-bend” putters, depending on the number of bends in the shaft.

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Top Golf Companies

By Patrick Cameron

There are virtually hundreds of golf manufacturers in the market today. Everything from small, mom-and-pop custom club fitters to large international conglomerates that cross over sporting goods boundaries. Golf is such an old game that companies that were once titans of the industry no longer have any bearing on the game. Several companies rise to the top when you think about the most successful golf-related companies in the world.

Overview

There are virtually hundreds of golf manufacturers in the market today. Everything from small, mom-and-pop custom club fitters to large international conglomerates that cross over sporting goods boundaries. Golf is such an old game that companies that were once titans of the industry no longer have any bearing on the game. Several companies rise to the top when you think about the most successful golf-related companies in the world.

Nike

Nike owns more than half of the overall sports market.

Until the mid-1990s, this Beaverton, Oregon, company had virtually no brand value in the game of golf. Then came Tiger Woods. Woods signed his first contract with the then-shoe giant in 1996. Buoyed by the success of their No. 1 golfer as much as their evolving line of equipment and apparel, including clubs, balls and, of course, footwear, Nike consistently ranks in the top five of golf companies worldwide.

Callaway

Callaway came about in the 1980s and today is one of the leading golf brands in the United States and beyond. The company was founded by a wine maker, no less. Ely Callaway bought a company called Hickory Stick and changed the name over to Callaway Hickory Stick. The name became its current Callaway Golf Company in 1988. Its most successful product, Big Bertha metal woods, were launched in 1991 and spurred its growth over the next two decades. The company sponsors a number of the top professional golfers in the world, including Phil Mickelson, Ernie Els, Arnold Palmer and Annika Sorenstam. It also bought out such legendary golf companies as Ben Hogan and Top-Flite.

Acushnet

No golf ball brand carries more weight on the PGA Tour than Titleist. It claims the No.

1 ranking in golf ball usage (as of 2010), an accomplishment that overshadows the fact that the Titleist brand is just one of many that fall under the Acushnet corporate moniker. Other products that the billion-dollar golf conglomerate produces include Pinnacle golf balls, Scotty Cameron putters and Foot Joy golf shoes and apparel. The company line has been to keep many of its products in the hands of golf pro shops, but it also has extended to include golf retailers around the world.

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Different Putter Grips

By Justin Johnson

Putter grips are one of the most overlooked and underappreciated items in a golfer’s bag. Most golfers do not even give a second thought to their putter grip. Improvements in technology have upgraded most golf club components, but putter grips are still similar to past models as of 2010. The introduction of mid-length, or belly, putters and long putters, however, has brought to market a new type of grip in addition to the standard version.

Overview

Putter grips are one of the most overlooked and underappreciated items in a golfer’s bag. Most golfers do not even give a second thought to their putter grip. Improvements in technology have upgraded most golf club components, but putter grips are still similar to past models as of 2010. The introduction of mid-length, or belly, putters and long putters, however, has brought to market a new type of grip in addition to the standard version.

Traditional Putter Grips

Most putters are standard length, in the 33- to 36-inch range. Such grips are similar to those from bygone eras. The most common putter grips are either pistol grips or paddle grips. Pistol grips get their name because their shape resembles an actual pistol grip in that it has a protruding section on the back that helps the golfer correctly grip the putter.

The paddle grip gets its name from the flat front section used for lining up the thumbs correctly on the putter grip. Both these grips are easy to use and install and are comfortable for most golfers.

Jumbo Putter Grips

Jumbo putter grips have been around for many years, but have just recently begun to regain popularity as of 2010. Golfers who want to reduce wrist action during their putting stroke favor jumbo grips The larger grip forces their wrists to be still, often resulting in a steadier stroke.

Mid-Length Putter Grips

The mid-length putter, or belly putter, has been a popular putting alternative since its arrival on the PGA Tour in the late 1990s. The belly putter is placed against the abdomen, which allows the golfer to swing the putter like a pendulum. The grips for belly putters have changed, as they were initially a split grip, with a 12- to 15-inch bottom section and a 4- to 6-inch top section, separated by an approximately 4-inch gap. This has recently been largely replaced with one-piece grips approximately 15 to 20 inches long. This newer style of grip allows the golfer to place his hands anywhere on the shaft of the putter covered with the grip for a more comfortable setup.

Long Putter Grips

Long putters have gained popularity because of a small contingent of pro golf tour members who use them. This putter allows the golfer to stand straight above the putting line for a better view of the putt. Split grips most often are used on long putters. This style of grip allows the golfer to control the putter much like a pendulum, with the golfer grasping the shorter grip with a steady hand and swinging the putter with the hand that grips the longer grip.

Published by MyGolfingBlog@Gmail.com

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